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Raptor repairmen: 325th AMXS keeping airpower alive

Senior Airman Stephen Holmes, 325th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, F-22 Raptor integrated avionics systems journeyman, performs routine maintenance on the weapon bay of an F-22, Nov. 2 in Hangar 2. All aircraft must undergo routine maintenance in order to remain flight capable and ensure pilot safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen/Released)

Senior Airman Stephen Holmes, 325th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, F-22 Raptor integrated avionics systems journeyman, performs routine maintenance on the weapon bay of an F-22, Nov. 2 in Hangar 2. All aircraft must undergo routine maintenance in order to remain flight capable and ensure pilot safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen/Released)

Staff Sgt. William Trisch, 325th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron F-22 Raptor crew chief, checks the wheel well of a Raptor during a preflight check  Nov. 2 on the Tyndall flightline. Before any jet flies, crew chiefs must perform a check to ensure all systems and components are in working order and are flight ready. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen/Released)

Staff Sgt. William Trisch, 325th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron F-22 Raptor crew chief, checks the wheel well of a Raptor during a preflight check Nov. 2 on the Tyndall flightline. Before any jet flies, crew chiefs must perform a check to ensure all systems and components are in working order and are flight ready. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen/Released)

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. -- Every machine in the world needs someone who can maintain and fix it. For Tyndall's F-22 Raptors, the 325th Fighter Wing has a dedicated group of maintainers within the 325th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron who are determined to advance the wings ability to train and project unrivaled combat airpower.

The 325th AMXS provides skilled maintenance to Tyndall's 55 F-22s, the Air Force's largest contingent of 5th generation fighters. Its mission is to generate safe, reliable aircraft and develop professional Airmen.

"We are committed to executing safe, reliable and effective maintenance to guarantee the most capable aircraft for our pilots," said 2nd Lieutenant Jarod McPherson, 325th AMXS assistant officer in charge of the 43rd Aircraft Maintenance Unit.  "We develop our Airmen both personally and professionally to ensure they accomplish the mission successfully."

The squadron's 500 personnel manage its more than $8.8 billion worth of aircraft, ensuring worldwide combat lethality.

The 325th AMXS is broken into two units; the 43rd AMU and the 95th Aircraft Maintenance Unit. Though the two units are separated, they share the same goal of keeping jets in the sky to ensure our nations safety.

The 43rd AMU services jets that allow the 43rd Fighter Squadron to complete its unique mission of training F-22 pilots.

The 95th AMU services jets that allow the 95th Fighter Squadron, Tyndall's first combat coded unit, to accomplish its mission of projecting unrivaled combat air power.

Each unit is broken into six sections. These sections work in unison to accomplish each unit's mission.

The Tactical Aircraft Maintenance Section, or crew chiefs, performs all mechanical systems configuration, maintenance and flight servicing. They also launch and recover the aircraft during takeoff and landings.

The Avionics Section, or specialists, performs avionics systems configuration, maintenance and operational checks.

Within the Weapons Section, Airmen perform weapons systems maintenance, load configurations and operational checks.

The Support Section, or supply section, provides consolidated tool kits and support equipment for all aircraft and flight line maintenance. They also order, track and turn in all supply assets in support of aircraft maintenance.

The Debrief Section debriefs, documents and tracks all pilot reported discrepancies and fault reporting codes.

Lastly, the Programs Section ensures all support functions to include mobility, safety, resources and personnel are provided to support the maintenance mission. 

The mission of the 325th AMXS only gets accomplished if these sections work in unison, guaranteeing the Raptors can fly and provide airpower like no other jet can.

"I am so proud of the men and women of the 325th AMXS Griffins," said Lt. Col. Charity Banks, 325th AMXS commander. "Day or night, rain or shine, in the cold or the heat, every day our Airmen are providing safe and reliable aircraft to the 325th Fighter Wing pilots.  They overcome multiple challenges to ensure we meet the wing's mission of training and projecting unrivaled combat air power."