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325th Communications Squadron

325th Communications Squadron

325th Communications Squadron

Mission 

The 325th Communications Squadron is one of five squadrons assigned to the 325th Mission Support Group, 325th Fighter Wing, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. The squadron provides the 325th Fighter Wing, Headquarters First Air Force, and 29 associate units with advanced communications, computer, and information management systems, air traffic control maintenance systems, postal and visual information support and communications security. Direct communications support for the Homeland Defense and air dominance training mission of the Air Force's only F/A-22 training mission and air battle manager school is also provided. The squadron is responsible for more than $150 million in equipment, 12 facilities and an operating budget exceeding $2 million. Squadron personnel ensure the availability of telephone/computer networks, meteorological/air traffic control/landing systems, land mobile radios, cable television and intrusion detection systems, cellular/other wireless communications and visual information systems/frequency management.

History 

The 325th CS traces its lineage back to 1948. The squadron was first constituted the 325th Communications Squadron, Fighter, All Weather, on May 10, 1948 at Hamilton Air Force Base, Calif., and subsequently activated on June 9, 1948. The squadron served at numerous locations throughout the Korean War until it was deactivated on Feb. 6, 1952. On June 20, 1955, the unit was redesignated the 325th Operations Squadron and activated on Aug. 18, 1955 at McChord Air Force Base, Wash., where it remained until April 1, 1963, when it was discontinued and deactivated. The unit was redesignated the 325th Communications Squadron at Tyndall on May 1, 1991 as part of the 325th Fighter Wing.

The 325th CS Emblem represents the Air Force colors, blue and yellow. Blue alludes to the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow refers to the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The lightning flash symbolizes the swiftness and power of the unit in delivering support. The three stars represent the squadron's fierce determination and loyalty. The sun alludes to the unit's dedication to service, extreme courage, virtue, and strength. 

Commander
Maj. James Johnson