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325th MUNS to support WSEP East

Two men place a spacer on a missile

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Thomas Knight, right, and Senior Airman Jonathan Sosa, left, 325th Munitions Squadron Weapons System Evaluation Program precision guided munitions crew chiefs, insert a telemetry kit into the body of an AIM-120 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, Aug. 25, 2021. The telemetry kit serves to communicate data between the aircraft and the missile, allowing for more accurate testing and post-mission evaluation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tiffany Price)

A man is sitting behind a missile

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Cyrus Griffin, 325th Munitions Squadron Weapons System Evaluation Program precision guided munitions crew chief, prepares to remove a spacer from an AIM-120 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, Aug. 25, 2021. Spacers are placed on missiles in order to prevent damage during transportation and while other maintenance is performed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tiffany Price)

Man kneeling beside a missile

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Thomas Knight, 325th Munitions Squadron Weapons System Evaluation Program precision guided munitions crew chief, prepares to remove a spacer from an AIM-120 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, Aug. 25, 2021. Spacers are placed on missiles in order to prevent damage during transportation and while other maintenance is performed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tiffany Price)

Man uses a tool to secure a spacer on a missile

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jonathan Sosa, 325th Munitions Squadron Weapons System Evaluation Program precision guided munitions crew chief, removes a spacer from an AIM-120 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, Aug. 25, 2021. Spacers are placed on missiles in order to prevent damage during transportation and while other maintenance is performed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tiffany Price)

Two men work together to unscrew a spacer on a missile

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Thomas Knight (left), and Senior Airman Jonathan Sosa (right), 325th Munitions Squadron Weapons System Evaluation Program precision guided munitions crew chiefs, loosen screws on an AIM-120 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, Aug. 25, 2021. The AIM-120 AMRAAM is used during Tyndall’s WSEP, an exercise designed to test the capabilities of pilots and their aircraft during air-to-air combat. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tiffany Price)

Missiles are stacked on a rack

AIM-9 Sidewinder Missiles are stock piled at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, Aug. 25, 2021. In preparation for a Weapons System Evaluation Program, the 325th Munitions Squadron builds and prepares munitions as early as possible to stay ahead of schedule. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tiffany Price)

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. --

While the munitions mission is critical to maintaining air dominance across U.S. Air Force, Tyndall Air Force Base’s 325th Munitions Squadron has a unique aspect tied in with their mission; supporting the training and projection of unrivaled combat airpower.

Tyndall hosts regular Weapons System Evaluation Program exercises led by the 53rd Weapons Evaluation Group. WSEP is designed to test the abilities of Department of Defense pilots and their aircraft during air-to-air and air-to-ground combat operations.

The 325th MUNS supports approximately 10 WSEPs each year, including WSEP West held at Hill AFB, Utah. Each exercise comes with different munition needs, and on average, the 325th MUNS supplies more than 200 missiles per year in support of WSEP exercises. While AMMO preparations are year round, the 325th MUNS begins to focus on each specific mission approximately 30 days out in order to properly maintain scheduling and missile storage plans.

“Essentially, we disassemble missiles, install additional testing components, perform off aircraft missile testing and deliver these to flying units during WSEPs,” said Master Sgt. Cassie Barnwell, 325th MUNS WSEP section chief. “The uniqueness of our team is that we are the only certified unit in the Air Force to perform these modifications. This is also a very time sensitive operation, when our clock starts we have very tight windows to install components, test and then fly these assets.”


WSEP provides the opportunity for AMMO to showcase a specific skill set that, as Barnwell stated, makes Tyndall a “coveted assignment.”

“The program evaluates all phases of combat operations from weapons assembly to the ‘end-to-kill-chain’ evaluation of weapon, man and machine combat in a realistic environment,” said Barnwell.

The 325th Fighter Wing’s mission of training and projecting unrivaled combat airpower is directly supported by AMMO’s ability to provide proper weapons for testing, training and combat missions.

“AMMO is a key player in the success, readiness and advancement of combat airpower,” said Barnwell. “Our role is vital as we ensure the availability and serviceability of specialized weapons to support the combat Air Force.