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Wingmen walking for a cure

Major Lori Bort, 337th Air Control Squadron air battle manager instructor, holds her son, Gaven, Aug. 26. Gavin was diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis at 10 days old, and Bort is facilitating a Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Great Strides walk to help raise awareness of CF and founding for research to find a cure for the disease. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alex Echols)

Major Lori Bort, 337th Air Control Squadron air battle manager instructor, holds her son, Gaven, Aug. 26. Gavin was diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis at 10 days old, and Bort is facilitating a Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Great Strides walk to help raise awareness of CF and founding for research to find a cure for the disease. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alex Echols)

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. -- Airmen typically face battle in a deployed location, but for one, her fight hit a little closer to home.

However, similar to a deployment, her wingmen came to her aid.

Major Lori Bort, 337th Air Control Squadron air battle manager instructor, is facilitating a Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Great Strides walk. Bort's son, Gaven, was diagnosed with CF when he was just 10 days old.

"Gaven's Groupies," Bort's team of around 60 people, was originally supposed to walk in the Destin Great Strides walk, but since the team was so large, the CF Foundation asked Bort if she would facilitate a walk in Panama City.

She received overwhelming support from her fellow Airmen at Tyndall as well as local businesses and people in the community. Tyndall's Focus 5/6 Group and the 325th Medical Group both have teams signed up to walk.

"It's awesome," said Bort. "This is one of the largest teams the CF Foundation has ever seen, and everyone has been really supportive. We're hoping with more research and funding we can find an actual cure."

The 5 K walk will take place 9 a.m. on Sept. 13 at St. Andrews State Park with check-in beginning at 8 a.m. For information visit the CF Foundation's website.

The goals of the Great Strides walks are to raise awareness of Cystic Fibrosis and funding for research to find a cure for the disease.

So far, the walk has 81 participants with over $4,600 in donations.

"Cystic fibrosis is a life-threatening genetic disease that primarily affects the lungs and digestive system. An estimated 30,000 children and adults in the United States (70,000 worldwide) have CF. [The disease] clogs the lungs and leads to life-threatening lung infections, [and it] obstructs the pancreas and stops natural enzymes from helping the body break down food and absorb vital nutrients," according to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's website.