HomeNewsArticle Display

FACES OF TYNDALL; 325th Civil Engineer Squadron

Brian Stahl, 325th Civil Engineer Squadron deputy base civil engineer and Tyndall Air Force Base Program Management Office deputy director, poses for a photo Aug. 23, 2019, at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. Stahl plays a major role in the base’s recovery efforts supporting operations, maintenance, repair and construction of property to effectively sustain Tyndall’s land and facilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dylan Auger)

Brian Stahl, 325th Civil Engineer Squadron deputy base civil engineer and Tyndall Air Force Base Program Management Office deputy director, poses for a photo Aug. 23, 2019, at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. Stahl plays a major role in the base’s recovery efforts supporting operations, maintenance, repair and construction of property to effectively sustain Tyndall’s land and facilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dylan Auger)

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. --

Brian Stahl, 325th Civil Engineer Squadron deputy base civil engineer and Tyndall Air Force Base Program Management Office deputy director, has played a major role in the base’s recovery efforts.

The 325th CES is responsible for maintaining the operations, maintenance, repair and construction of property to effectively sustain Tyndall’s land and facilities. 

Stahl’s roles include advising the director of the PMO and advising the commander of the 325th CES.

Stahl was one of the 93 personnel who stayed on base during Hurricane Michael and weathered the storm.

“We were running the Crisis Action Team and the Emergency Operations Center,” said Stahl. “Normally those are separate, but during the hurricane they were consolidated into the same room.”

Stahl said many people stayed on base for several days following the storm, as the EOC began coordinating recovery efforts.

“Normally during a Category 1 or Category 2 storm, the recovery is started with damage assessments,” said Stahl.

However, this storm was much stronger, registering at a Category 5.

“With this storm, most standard procedure went out the window,” said Stahl. “We had no power, no water, roads were blocked, and we had no communication.”

After debris was cleared from around the base and communication was restored, the focus shifted towards making essential buildings functional and safe for use again. 

“It’s how we rebuild Tyndall,” said Stahl. “It’s how we secure the funding, how we develop the projects, and how we deconflict all of the thousands of contractors that will be working on the base during the next few years.”

Stahl said that although most projects they’ve done were to get buildings operational, Tyndall does have plans to improve upon functionality in the future.

“The most interesting project is the master plan for development,” said Stahl. “We’re putting buildings together that make sense being together.”

Stahl said the new project will include walking paths between common areas and living areas, and an overpass on Highway 98, allowing for easier travel between the North and South sides of base.

In addition to being a civilian service member, Stahl is a father and enjoys boating and fishing.