HomeNewsArticle Display

Checkertail Airmen’s excellence, resiliency focus of CMSAF visit

Chief Bass looks over an Airman driving a truck simulator.

Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force JoAnne S. Bass looks over the shoulder of Airman 1st Class MaryCruz Vera-Bedolla, 325th Logistics Readiness Squadron ground transportation support operator, as she drives a vehicle simulator at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, March 29, 2021. Tyndall is the first base in the Department of Defense to house two of the Doron 550 TruckPlus simulators. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anabel Del Valle)

Chief Bass stands on a ladder talking to Airmen working on an F-22 Raptor.

Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force JoAnne S. Bass speaks with Airmen from the 325th Maintenance Squadron at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, March 29, 2021. Chief Bass visited Tyndall to learn more about the Airman behind Tyndall’s air dominance mission and its ongoing rebuild. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anabel Del Valle)

Chief Bass talks with Master Sgt. Michael Stout as they look over part of an air craft

Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force JoAnne S. Bass speaks with Master Sgt. Michael Stout, 325th Maintenance Squadron low observables chief, at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, March 29, 2021. Stout explained to Chief Bass the tedious process of keeping Tyndall’s F-22 Raptors mission ready. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anabel Del Valle)

Col. Greg Moseley talks with Chief Bass.

Col. Greg Moseley, 325th Fighter Wing commander, speaks with Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force JoAnne S. Bass at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, March 29, 2021. Chief Bass visited Tyndall to learn more about the Airman behind Tyndall’s air dominance mission and its ongoing rebuild. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anabel Del Valle)

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. --

Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force JoAnne S. Bass visited Tyndall, March 29, to learn more about the Airman behind Tyndall’s air dominance mission and its ongoing rebuild.

Chief Bass visited many of Tyndall’s units throughout her trip, recognizing some of the 325th Fighter Wing’s outstanding Airmen along the way.

 “Tyndall Airmen have shown tremendous resiliency and resolve over the past few years,” said Chief Bass. “From Hurricane Michael to COVID-19, our Airmen and families have come together to fight through and rebuild the installation. Hearing their stories and seeing their strength has been inspiring.”

One of Chief Bass' main objectives to better the Air Force is to promote the “Accelerate Change or Lose,” a strategic approach from the Chief of Staff of the Air Force, Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr. Tyndall is at the forefront of change in light of the ongoing rebuild.

“The mission at Tyndall is essential to our national defense strategy,” said Chief Bass. “The rebuilding efforts ensure that we project airpower globally while accelerating change to modernize the installation to support our Airmen better.”

As part of the rebuild process to build the 21st-century installation the Air Force needs, Tyndall continues with technological advances such as Quad-legged Unmanned Ground Vehicles for increased base protection and 3D mammography for better cancer detection. In years to come, Tyndall is expected to continue setting the standard for Air Force installations.

“Tyndall has a unique opportunity to serve as the model for what our Air Force installations need to look like to optimize how we organize, train, and equip for any future high-end fight,” said Chief Bass. “Advancements in training, resourcing and readiness will ensure that our bases are poised to tackle the challenges that come our way.”

According to Chief Bass, taking care of the Airmen behind the mission is critical to operational readiness.

“Organizations are most effective when there is a culture in place where people feel valued, respected, and heard,” said Chief Bass. “When that culture is in place, every person is able to thrive and perform their very best. In an era of contested dominance, every single Airman matters, and we need them aware of where they fit into the picture.”