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Tyndall Airman Leadership School accelerates change

Four Airmen standing outside a building

From left, U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Marshall Dixon, 325th Force Support Squadron Airman Leadership School commandant, Tech. Sgt. Dylan King, Tech. Sgt. Jennifer Cannet, and Staff Sgt. Aaron Bell, 325th FSS ALS instructors, pose for a photo outside the ALS schoolhouse at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, Sept. 13, 2021. The instructor cadre are tasked with educating and shaping junior enlisted Airmen into noncommissioned officers ready to lead and accelerate change. (U.S. Air Force photo by 2nd Lt. Joseph Harclerode)

Logo on a wall

The U.S. Air Force Airman Leadership School emblem is displayed in the schoolhouse at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, Sept. 13, 2021. The ALS curriculum is taught at 68 Air and Space Force installations in the United States, including Tyndall. (U.S. Air Force photo by 2nd Lt. Joseph Harclerode)

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. --

“Accelerate Change or Lose” is Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. CQ Brown Jr.’s vision to constructing a more lethal force. At Tyndall Air Force Base’s Airman Leadership School, this initiative influences every aspect of the training curriculum.

Every Airmen brings a different perspective and skillset to the Air Force when they join. However, there are core competencies each Airman must learn before earning the title of “noncommissioned officer.” Falling under Air Education and Training Command, ALS teaches its curriculum at 68 active duty Air and Space Force schools in the United States, including Tyndall.

“Our mission is to grow and train first-line supervisors who understand their roles of projecting unrivaled combat air power,” said Master Sgt. Marshall Dixon, 325th Force Support Squadron ALS commandant. “We teach the profession of arms, communication skills and leadership studies.”

ALS is the first level of Professional Military Education which enlisted Airmen must complete. A main focus of the program is to prepare Airmen and Guardians for the greater responsibilities they will face as they progress in rank. Leadership, followership, problem solving and critical thinking are all key aspects of the curriculum.

“By the time students leave here they have a better understanding of what is expected for them as future leaders and they get a peek behind the scenes of what their supervisors who are leading them now have to endure as leaders,” said Dixon.

Dixon noted that the ALS curriculum at Tyndall had been similar for nearly 30 years before they adopted the “Accelerate Change or Lose” vision. Since then, the training curriculum has evolved through teaching present-day communication techniques and upgraded leadership case studies to reflect today’s modernized Air Force.  

Tyndall ALS has remained resilient in accomplishing its mission despite the restrictions brought about by COVID-19.

“Right now our ALS functions in completely virtual classroom settings,” Dixon said. “I think it's amazing how we are able to shift and use the virtual platform. Both the students and the instructors feel very comfortable while training is virtual.”

The instructor cadre at Tyndall ALS are dedicated to providing the most professional training to Airmen. They are charged with educating and shaping the leaders who will be the ones accelerating change in the Air Force for years to come.

“Listen to what your instructors have to say. We have a well-versed cadre who are excellent instructors,” said Dixon. “If the Airmen listen to what the instructors have to tell them and be proactive versus reactive, they can be very successful. Tyndall ALS is here to build tomorrow’s leaders.” 

“Accelerate Change or Lose” is Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. CQ Brown Jr.’s vision to constructing a more lethal force. At Tyndall Air Force Base’s Airman Leadership School, this initiative influences every aspect of the training curriculum.

Every Airmen brings a different perspective and skillset to the Air Force when they join. However, there are core competencies each Airman must learn before earning the title of “noncommissioned officer.” Falling under Air Education and Training Command, ALS teaches its curriculum at 68 active duty Air and Space Force schools in the United States, including Tyndall.

“Our mission is to grow and train first-line supervisors who understand their roles of projecting unrivaled combat air power,” said Master Sgt. Marshall Dixon, 325th Force Support Squadron ALS commandant. “We teach the profession of arms, communication skills and leadership studies.”

ALS is the first level of Professional Military Education which enlisted Airmen must complete. A main focus of the program is to prepare Airmen and Guardians for the greater responsibilities they will face as they progress in rank. Leadership, followership, problem solving and critical thinking are all key aspects of the curriculum.

“By the time students leave here they have a better understanding of what is expected for them as future leaders and they get a peek behind the scenes of what their supervisors who are leading them now have to endure as leaders,” said Dixon.

Dixon noted that the ALS curriculum at Tyndall had been similar for nearly 30 years before they adopted the “Accelerate Change or Lose” vision. Since then, the training curriculum has evolved through teaching present-day communication techniques and upgraded leadership case studies to reflect today’s modernized Air Force.  

Tyndall ALS has remained resilient in accomplishing its mission despite the restrictions brought about by COVID-19.

“Right now our ALS functions in completely virtual classroom settings,” Dixon said. “I think it's amazing how we are able to shift and use the virtual platform. Both the students and the instructors feel very comfortable while training is virtual.”

The instructor cadre at Tyndall ALS are dedicated to providing the most professional training to Airmen. They are charged with educating and shaping the leaders who will be the ones accelerating change in the Air Force for years to come.

“Listen to what your instructors have to say. We have a well-versed cadre who are excellent instructors,” said Dixon. “If the Airmen listen to what the instructors have to tell them and be proactive versus reactive, they can be very successful. Tyndall ALS is here to build tomorrow’s leaders.”