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Meet the Commander: Major Jared Mitchell

Colonel Derek C. France, the 325th Fighter Wing commander, passes the 325th Comptroller Squadron guidon to Maj. Jared Mitchell, 325th CPTS commander, during a change of command ceremony June 30. Mitchell replaces Maj. Timothy Fast who will go on to serve as the 82nd Comptroller Squadron commander at Sheppard AFB, Texas. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alex Echols/Released)

Colonel Derek C. France, the 325th Fighter Wing commander, passes the 325th Comptroller Squadron guidon to Maj. Jared Mitchell, 325th CPTS commander, during a change of command ceremony June 30. Mitchell replaces Maj. Timothy Fast who will go on to serve as the 82nd Comptroller Squadron commander at Sheppard AFB, Texas. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alex Echols/Released)

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. -- Originally having childhood dreams of being a professional athlete, the new 325th Comptroller Squadron commander has since made a drastic change of career choice.

Meet Maj. Jared Mitchell, the new 325th CPTS commander, for the 325th Fighter Wing at Tyndall Air Force Base.

As the 325th CPTS commander, Mitchell has an important job for the wing.  His squadron provides a wide spectrum of financial services to individuals, commanders and fund managers. The squadron consists of two flights, Financial Services and Financial Analysis.  Many new Airmen that come to Tyndall deal with the Financial Services Flight to keep their accounts and pay in order.

"Originally I wanted to be a combat rescue officer, but I ended up being matched with finance," Mitchell said.  "I never imagined myself in this job, but I've worked with some amazing people, and I wouldn't change it for anything.  It was one of the best decisions I didn't get to make."

Mitchell said he's excited to be taking command of such an important squadron, and his family is ready to become a part of Team Tyndall.

"I feel very fortunate to be selected for the opportunity to serve this command," Mitchell said.  "I've been to a few places and Tyndall is a pretty good gig.  My wife wanted Florida, and my kids are always excited for a new place and a new adventure."

Mitchell said he is also ready for the next chapter in his career and to experience whatever Tyndall has to offer.

"I look forward to what happens next, the next task, the next challenge and the opportunity to solve a problem," Mitchell said.  "Whether it's a minute, an hour, or a year, I like to plan and achieve goals."

Mitchell is originally from the town of Butte, Nebraska, a small town near the South Dakota border.  He is the oldest of six children and has two sisters and three brothers.  Mitchell went to Butte High School and graduated as valedictorian.

"Being valedictorian was quite the accomplishment, especially since my class had 18 people in it," Mitchell laughed.  "My town is so small.  It's always shrinking, it was 452 people when I was growing up, and the last census said that the population is 326 residents now."

After graduating high school, Mitchell attended the University of Nebraska and enrolled into the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps program with his roommate.

"My college roommate talked me into checking out AFROTC.  I wasn't sure what I wanted to do after graduating college, so I thought I would give it a go," Mitchell said.  "It turned out to be one of the best decisions I could make."

During college, Mitchell met his wife, Eve; they worked together at the University of Nebraska Federal Credit Union.  They started dating shortly after, and were married a year later.  Mitchell has three daughters with his wife.

"I'm passionate about my family, it doesn't matter what we are doing, I love every minute of it," Mitchell said.  "My proudest moment was becoming a father.  Any other accomplishment is just another step in the process, but becoming a father and seeing my little girls succeed at their own goals is my greatest accomplishment in life."

Finally, Mitchell shared what he thought every Airman should know about success in the Air Force and in life. "If an Airman learns to control what they can control, and adapt to what they cannot, then I believe they will succeed," Mitchell said.  

"You can control your effort, attitude, perceptions and your mindset that you take into any situation.  It's all in how you handle things.  You may not be able to predict the weather or control other people, but you can make your own response and rise above any adversity, Mitchell advised.  "The Air Force is a great opportunity to succeed, so don't waste it.  Take advantage of the adventure."