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Show me the money

Senior Airmen Maria L. Faulkner, 325th Comptroller Squadron financial analyst, and Staff Sgt. Drew Newlon, 325th CPTS financial analyst supervisor review, 65-series Air Force Instruction to determine if a unit's purchase request is in legal and proper prior to funds certification. Professionals at the budget office maintain matters of fiscal nature on Tyndall. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Solomon Cook)

Senior Airmen Maria L. Faulkner, 325th Comptroller Squadron financial analyst, and Staff Sgt. Drew Newlon, 325th CPTS financial analyst supervisor review, 65-series Air Force Instruction to determine if a unit's purchase request is in legal and proper prior to funds certification. Professionals at the budget office maintain matters of fiscal nature on Tyndall. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Solomon Cook)

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. --

The saying goes, "Money makes the world go round" and the 325th Comptroller Squadron is no exception. They share a large part in ensuring Tyndall's jets remain in the air.

The 325th CPTS base budget office is required to purchase everything from notebooks to aircraft parts. Anything anyone needs to make the mission a success comes through the budget office first.

After the budget office gets a proposal together they then submit it to the base's major command, Air Combat Command, for approval.

 "The budget office acts as a liaison between the commanders at the base level and MAJCOM," said Staff Sgt. Drew Newlon, 325th CPTS financial analysis supervisor. "We request and execute funding and make sure all things finance related run smoothly."

These requests come in annual packages.

"It details what is needed for next year and how we plan to spend the money," said Newlon. "Basically, we let them know the cost of doing business. We have to keep the doors open and it requires some type of funding."

Although the budget office submits everything units need, some of it may not get funded. It all depends upon Air Force needs.

"Sometimes MAJCOM gives us the money we ask for and sometimes it comes up a little short," said Newlon. "When that happens, we have to work with what we have. Some requirements are higher priority than others."

Handling the budget for a military base is not something that one person takes care of; the entire office is devoted to maintaining a fiscal balance.

"The Financial Management Analysis flight is composed of seven military members and three civilians, said Capt. Michelle Kim, 325th CPTS chief financial analyst. "Their responsibility lies in the financial planning and budget execution for the 325th Fighter Wing and tenants. Each individual within the FMA office is assigned as an analyst to a group, squadron or tenant level organization; this is dependent on complexity of each section."

Some organizations have a dedicated analyst, while others may have to share their analyst with two or more organizations. This is due to the sheer size of their budget and number of requirements, Kim added.

 

"Every day in the office is a new day," said Kim. "Problems or situations arise across the base and our office is here to help find solutions or alternatives. As a trusted financial manager, our job is to provide alternatives that continue the Air Force's mission."

 

The budget office will continue to be the fiscal hawk of Tyndall, acquiring tools the Airmen need to get the job done.

 

"At the end of the day, every time I hear a jet in the air I smile a little bit," said Newlon. "Knowing that my office helped a jet take off fills me with a sense of pride."